minimum wage

How Long of A Meal Period Are You Entitled To?

meal-period

According to California law, an employer may not employ an employee for a work period of more than five hours per day without providing the employee with a meal period of no less than 30 minutes. However, if the total work period day of the employee is no more than 6 hours, the meal period may be waived by mutual consent of both the employee and the employer.

A second meal period of not less than 30 minutes is required if an employee works more than 10 hours per day. However, if the total hours worked is no more than 12 hours, the second meal period may be waived by mutual consent of both the employee and the employer only if the first meal period was not waived.

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

Are you or anyone you know been deprived of your meal period? Contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://employmentlawyersla.com/ if you have any questions regarding your rights at the workplace.

3 Common Overtime Mistakes

overtime_pay

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) regulates the payment of overtime. Here are three common overtime mistakes:

Mistake #1: Misclassifying employees – some employers classify workers as independent contractors to escape liability for overtime wages. Courts look at whether an individual is “economically dependent on the business to which he renders service or is, as a matter of economic fact, in business for himself,” and they use a variety of factors to determine whether an individual is an employee or independent contractor.

Mistake #2: Exemption confusion – Paying an employee a salary does not necessarily make him exempt from overtime wages. Most employees who are exempt from overtime fall under the executive, administrative, or professional exemptions (also known as the white- collar exemptions), which require payment on a salary basis. However, for the white-collar exemption to apply, an employee must meet the duties test and be paid a minimum salary of $455 per week.

Mistake #3: Calculating the regular rate – employers should make sure to properly calculate employees’ regular rate of pay. Overtime is calculated at 1.5 times an employee’s regular rate for all hours worked in excess of 8 hours up to and including 12 hours in any workday and for the first 8 hours worked on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek. Further, double overtime is calculated as 2 times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 12 hours in any workday and for all hours worked in excess of 8 on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek. However, an employee’s regular rate is not necessarily the same as the hourly rate. If an employee’s only compensation is his hourly rate, the regular rate is the same as his hourly rate, and the overtime rate is 1.5 or 2 times that amount. If you provide any compensation over and above straight hourly wages, make sure you calculate any bonuses or compensations which must be included in the calculation of the regular rate.

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

Do you have any questions about your overtime wages? Contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://employmentlawyersla.com/

Minimum wage will be increased to $9.00 tomorrow

minimum-wage

Minimum wage will be increased to $9.00 tomorrow.

Certain types of employees such as outside salespersons, apprentices, and learners may be exempt from minimum wage requirements, but in general, the requirements apply regardless of whether employees are paid on an hourly, commission, or salaried basis.

Paying employees less than the applicable minimum wage is unlawful, and an agreement between an employer and an employee to do so is unenforceable. California’s Labor Code establishes penalties for minimum wage violations.

In addition to increases at the state level, some cities have passed their own minimum wages that top the state’s rate. For example, San Francisco and San Jose have set local minimum wages at $10.74 and $10.16 per hour, respectively.

Are you happy about the increase in minimum wage? Let us know!

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

Questions about your rights at the workplace? Contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://employmentlawyersla.com/

All You Need to Know About Tips

gratuity

“Gratuity” is defined as a tip, gratuity, or money that has been paid or given to or left for an employee by a patron of a business over and above the actual amount due for services rendered or for goods, food, drink, articles sold or served to patrons.

The law states that gratuities are the sole property of the employee or employees to whom they are given. Labor Code Section 351 prohibits employers from sharing in or keeping any portion of a gratuity left for employees by a patron. Furthermore, it is illegal for employers to make wage deductions from gratuities, or from using gratuities as direct or indirect credits against an employee’s wages.

In California, an employer cannot use an employee’s tips as a credit towards its obligation to pay the minimum wage. California law requires that employees receive the minimum wage plus any tips left for them by patrons of the employer’s business. Labor Code Section 351.

If your employer discriminates or retaliates against you in any manner whatsoever, for example, he discharges you because you object to his crediting your tips against your wages, or because you file a claim or threaten to file a claim with the Labor Commissioner, contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://employmentlawyersla.com/

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

All You Need to Know About Minimum Wage

Image

Currently, California’s minimum wage is $8.00 per hour. However, California’s minimum wage will be raised to $9.00 per hour on July 1, 2014 and to $10.00 on January 1, 2016.

Some facts to know about minimum wage:
• Minimum wage is an obligation of the employer and cannot be waived by any agreement, including collective bargaining agreements.
• Minimum wage is the same for both adult and minor employees.
• The employer may NOT use your tips as a credit toward its obligation to pay the minimum wage.
• If your employer discriminates or retaliates against you in any manner whatsoever, for example, he fires you because you asked him why you weren’t being paid the minimum wage, or because you file a claim or threaten to file a claim with the Labor Commissioner, you can file a discrimination/retaliation complaint.

What can you do if your employer does not pay you at least the minimum wage? Contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://employmentlawyersla.com/

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

The 5 Sins of Wage and Hour Management

Image

The 5 most commons sins managers and supervisors commit in paying, or not paying, employees what they are owed:

1. Failure to pay the minimum wage. “We’ll pay you $5 an hour until you learn the ropes; then you move up to $7 an hour.” This is illegal.
2. Failure to pay for all hours worked. “Be sure to stay close to your phone after work in case that customer calls in from the East Coast.” Employers must pay employees for all hours worked, even if the employee has volunteered to do the work without pay. Some examples include expecting employees to take customer calls off hours or insisting that they answer the phone during an unpaid lunch break.
3. Misclassifying as exempt. “Your title is Assistant manager; you’re exempt.” Companies may classify workers as exempt to avoid paying overtime and/or to avoid paying for extra hours worked. However, an employee’s title does not mean anything and the fact that the person is paid on a salary basis does not mean anything — it’s the job duties that determine whether a worker is exempt.
4. Misclassifying as independent contractors. “You’ll be working alongside our regular employees but you’ll be an independent contractor.” Many employers may classify workers as independent contractors in order to avoid payments that would have been made to employees on their behalf (e.g., Social Security). But many so-called “independent contractors” are actually employees. The more control the employer has over how the person does the job, the more likely that worker is not an independent contractor.
5. Failure to properly calculate and pay overtime. Employers can’t avoid their obligation to pay overtime. Under federal law, the employer is obligated to pay the employee at a rate of 1.5 times the regular rate for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek. Employees are also entitled to overtime pay for all hours worked over 8 hours a day. Finally, employers must pay employees at a rate of 2 times the regular hourly pay, if the employees works over 12 hours in one day.

Read More: http://goo.gl/EedPDh

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

Questions about your rights at the workplace? Contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://employmentlawyersla.com/

If I get injured in an accident or wrongfully terminated, how long do I have to make a claim?

Image

The time you have to file a lawsuit will vary from state to state depending on statute of limitations. Statute of limitation is the time within which a lawsuit or claim must be filed.

Some common statute of limitations include:

Personal Injury cases – you have 2 years from the day of the accident to file a lawsuit.
Discrimination, Harassment, Retaliation under California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (age, race, sex, disability, national origin discrimination, etc.) – Claims must be initially filed with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing within 1 year. Once the DFEH issues a Right to Sue Notice, the claimant has 1 year to file a case in court. Note that even if you miss the 1 year statute of limitations to file a DFEH Complaint, you can still file a claim for wrongful termination of public policy within the 2 year standard tort statute of limitations. Of course, when a potential FEHA claim is pursued as a public policy claim, you can not collect your attorneys’ fees as you could under FEHA.
Discrimination, Harassment, Retaliation under Title VII, ADEA and ADA (age, race, sex, disability, national origin discrimination, etc.) – In California, claims must be initially filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission with 300 days. Once the EEOC issues a Right to Sue Notice, the claimant has 90 days to file a case in federal court.
Unpaid Overtime, Minimum Wage, Meal and Rest Breaks – Claims must be filed with the Labor Commissioner or in court within 3 years of when the wages were earned.
Breach of Contract – If the contract is written, the lawsuit must be filed within 4 years of when the breach occurred. If the contract is oral or implied-in-fact, it must be filed within 2 years of the breach.
California Equal Pay Act – Actions for wage discrimination claims (ie- the opposite sex is paid a higher wage based on gender) is within 2 years for most actions, and 3 years if the violation was willful.
Family Medical Leave Act – Any action must be filed within 2 years after the violation, or within 3 years if the violation was willful.

If you’re debating whether or not to pursue a claim now or later down the road it will generally be to your benefit to file sooner than later as it’s typically easier to collect evidence and prove damages before too much time has passed.

The Law Offices of Payab & Associates is a Los Angeles based law firm with more than 17 years of experience in employment and personal injury cases. Our office has successfully litigated many complex disputes including car accidents, wrongful termination, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, wage and labor disputes, and retaliation cases.

Questions? Contact the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 or visit http://www.payablaw.com/

New California employment laws for 2014: What Your Business Needs to Know

The year of 2014 brings in a lot of new employment laws including a higher minimum wage, more powerful whistleblower protection, and new immigration status-related protections for employees.

image

Some highlights of new employment laws in California:
– As of July 1, 2014, California’s minimum wage of $8.00/hour will be increased to $9.00/hour.
– More broad protection under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) to include “military and veteran status.”
– More broad definition of harassment to now state that sexually harassing conduct need not be motivated by sexual desire. So long as the harassment was directed to someone because of his or her sex, the harassment is unlawful.
– Labor Code section 98.6 is expanded to protect an employee’s written or oral complaint that he or she is owed wages.
– As of July 1, 2014, the family temporary disability insurance program will be expanded to include wage replacement during time off to care for a seriously ill grandparent, grandchild, sibling or parent-in-law.

What does this all mean? More protection from harassment and discrimination for employees.

Source: http://goo.gl/iCayql

Call the Law Offices of Payab & Associates @ (800) 401-4466 if you have any questions regarding your rights at work.