Month: March 2019

Rights to Leave for Pregnant Employees

Rights to Leave for Pregnant Employees

Pregnant employees who work for larger employers are entitled to time off for pregnancy, childbirth, and bonding with a new child under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA).

The FMLA requires employers with 50 or more employees to provide eligible employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off for the following purposes:

for prenatal care
while unable to work due to pregnancy
for a serious health condition following childbirth, and
to bond with a new child.

David Payab, Esq. from The Law Offices of Payab & Associates can be reached @ (800) 401-4466 or by visiting http://payablaw.com

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Reasonable Accommodation for Pregnant Employees

Reasonable Accommodation for Pregnant Employees

Unlike other federal laws, such as those protecting employees with disabilities, the PDA does not impose an affirmative duty on employers to accommodate pregnant employees.

Instead, employers must provide reasonable accommodations to pregnant employees only such accommodations are provided to other employees who are temporarily limited in their ability to work.

For example, if your employer offers light-duty work to employees with broken bones or other temporary ailments, it may also be required to offer light duty to pregnant employees with medical restrictions. On the other hand, if your employer doesn’t offer accommodations to any employees, it won’t be required to give you a flexible schedule or light-duty work under the PDA.

David Payab, Esq. from The Law Offices of Payab & Associates can be reached @ (800) 401-4466 or by visiting http://payablaw.com

Pregnancy Discrimination Laws

Pregnancy Discrimination Laws

Pregnant employees are entitled to various protections under federal and state law, including the right not to be discriminated against, and in certain circumstances, the right to reasonable accommodation and time off from work.

While federal law sets the minimum requirements that employers in all states must follow, states are free to create laws that are more protective of pregnant employees.

Many states have done so, with some laws applying to a wider set of employers or providing greater accommodation or leave rights.

David Payab, Esq. from The Law Offices of Payab & Associates can be reached @ (800) 401-4466 or by visiting http://payablaw.com